Image by Meagan Helman

Image by Meagan Helman

 
 

I choreograph dances because I find clarity when working with moving bodies.

Choreographing allows me to let a thought unfold, to get off task, and to follow a curiosity to exhaustion. My process often starts with an image. I enjoy the connection of visual to visceral. I like seeing dancers interacting in a space and forming relationships with one another inside the movement vocabulary.

Now I am focusing my work on the relationship I have with my own body. My ballet training led me to leave my flawed, pedestrian self outside the doors of the dance studio, and to debrief my body from anything that could get in the way of perfecting the form. In nourishing my choreographic process, I am interested in teasing out what I formerly perceived as my imperfections. I search for individuality and idiosyncrasies in other dancers and in myself. By extension, I delight in the differences of bodies dancing in unison. I want to use ballet, a form that has often excluded uniqueness, to promote it.

I see my work in the way I see my life, as a continuous unfolding.